Como te llama?

Studio Album by released in 2008
Como te llama?'s tracklist:
Bargain of a Century
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In My Room
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Lisa
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GfC
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The Boss Americana
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Rocket
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Victory at Monterey
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You Won't Be Fooled by This
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Spooky Couch
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Borrowed Time
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G Up
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Miss Myrtle
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Feed Me Jack Or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Peter Sellers
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Como te llama? review

Albert Hammond, Jr.'s much anticipated sophomore effort

Albert Hammond, Jr., the guitarist of The Strokes is an example of that unique situation when a collective's member, not its front man, makes a successful solo career remaining the part of the team at the same time. Surprisingly his music has proved to be so original that all The Strokes' participants have supported the 28 year old guitarist and some of them have even participated in the recording of his debut album Yours To Keep in 2006 and its success has exceeded expectations. Hammond's great vocals and his talent of a composer have helped him to create a record that not only the fans of The Strokes found good but also appreciated those who like good rock in general. Now this gifted author releases his sophomore effort Como Te Llama. This album has been much anticipated and put great hopes on it. Well now we can easily state that the musician has fully justified them. Structured flawlessly Como Te Llama has proved a bit closer to the works of The Strokes but continues the tendency to joyful, optimistic and unusual music that began on the debut album.

A positive attitude on Como Te Llama

Thirteen tracks of Como Te Llama long about three minutes each with some exception are filled with most varied emotions from boundless happiness to melancholia, from optimism to darkness, from affection to anger. Nevertheless the album's general attitude is still positive which is but pleasing. A great guitar-piano composition Bargain Of A Century attracts with its being so melodious from the very first sounds while a heavier In My Room pleases with Hammond's heartfelt singing. An interesting rhythm and multileveled instruments sounding make a bit sullen track Lisa one of the most complicated on the record and GFC with its catchy tune and splendid riffs is perfect for the part of the single that it plays. A marvelous chorus on The Boss Americana will also linger in your mind whereas song Victory At Monterey is remarkable for a most contagious rhythm and amazing vocals underlined by guitars. Another great composition You Won't Be Fooled By This is different from all the previous material: its inimitable tune, the high notes in the vocals and interesting rhymes in the lyrics make it one of the album's highlights. The longest number (over seven minutes) Spooky Couch is the one the author can be rightfully proud with for this instrumental composition can become a splendid soundtrack for any quality movie. The Strokes' echo on Borrowed Time is not too obtrusive while joyful songs G Up and Miss Myrtle are the most reminiscent of Albert's debut album. The album closes with one of the best numbers Feed Me Jack Or: How I Learned To Stop Worrying And Love Peter Sellers, a piano ballad with a wonderfully beautiful tune.

A great continuation of the brilliant solo career

When Albert Hammond Jr., released his debut solo work his dream came true for there was exactly the kind of music on it he has always wanted to make. Naturally his creative work with The Strokes gives him no less joy but independence will be independence therefore he has decided to content with what he has achieved by no means. The five weeks of recording Como Te Llama on Electric Lady Studios in New York with the same musicians that accompanied him on the first work, i.e. bassist Josh Lattanzi and drummer Matt Romano have passed rather quickly for Albert Hammond Jr. The record's producers are himself and also engineer Gus Oberg and that very drummer Matt Romano, and the team has performed its task on a good A. Splendid arrangements, matched playing of all the musicians and Albert himself – all that and many other factors make Como Te Llama a great continuation of the brilliant solo career. Although many believe that the first work was much more original and hence more interesting they cannot but agree that the new album, too, offers quite a number of songs that do distinguish Hammond's music from that of The Strokes. We do not know when this great artist thinks to please us again but in view of the fact that there have been only two years between the first and the second albums one can guess that the third one will not make us wait too long.