80

Studio Album by released in 2005
80's tracklist:
Early in the Morning (feat. Van Morrison)
Send Ringtone
Tired of Your Jive (feat. Billy Gibbons)
Send Ringtone
The Thrill Is Gone (feat. Eric Clapton)
Send Ringtone
Need Your Love So Bad (feat. Sheryl Crow)
Send Ringtone
Ain't Nobody Home (feat. Daryl Hall)
Send Ringtone
Hummingbird (feat. John Mayer)
Send Ringtone
All Over Again (feat. Mark Knopfler)
Send Ringtone
Drivin' Wheel (feat. Glenn Frey)
Send Ringtone
There Must Be a Better World Somewhere (feat. Gloria Estefan)
Send Ringtone
Never Make Your Move Too Soon (feat. Roger Daltrey)
Send Ringtone
Funny How Time Slips Away (feat. Bobby Bland)
Send Ringtone
Rock This House (feat. Elton John)
Send Ringtone

80 review

One of the most influential guitarists of the 20th Century, B.B. King has achieved icon status, along with his guitar Lucille. Truly the blues greatest ambassador, B.B. continues to electrify audiences and spread the gospel of the blues. He turned 80 last month, and while he's surprised to still be actively playing music, he has no plans to stop, either. "It can't go on forever," he says. "The law of averages says every guy has to cut it out after awhile. But I intend for it as long as possible, as long as my health is pretty good… People still buy my records and come to my concerts. I wouldn't have bet you that I would've got over 50, but I'm happy to be here." The blues master's birthday gift to his fans is his third all-star collaboration. Its dozen tunes are a mix of classics and obscurities from King's past. 80, the first B.B. King’s release since 1997's Deuces Wild, was recorded in a variety of locations in the spring of 2005 and features newly recorded duets with some of today's biggest stars including Eric Clapton, Elton John, Sheryl Crow, John Mayer, Roger Daltry and many more.

It's unlikely B.B. King had to push hard to get an impressive lineup of A-listers to appear on this album. The blues giant's career predates rock by more than a decade, and most of the duet partners on this dics were in diapers while he was laying the groundwork for a style of music they would devote their lives to. Every guest takes a swing at reworking a B.B. King standard, with a pretty high batting average. Clapton adds his slowhand touch to The Thrill Is Gone while Morrison and King sound like long-lost brothers as they growl through Early in the Morning together. King teams with blues veteran Bobby "Blue" Bland for another highlight, a laid-back country stroll through Funny How Time Slips Away. Bland's warm, understated vocals, punctuated by King's spoken asides, make the song sound like an intimate after-hours jam. It's not surprising that the songs with Clapton, Bland, Mark Knopfler (All Over Again) and ZZ Top's Billy Gibbons (Tired of Your Jive) work so well. The revelation on 80 is that King fits so many of the unlikely collaborators into the blues. Daryl Hall exudes enough personality and blue-eyed soul to match King's considerable charisma on Ain't Nobody Home. And Roger Daltrey sounds reborn by the blues on Never Make Your Move Too Soon. Elton John slips back into Crocodile Rock mode for the closer, Rock This House, which rumbles through its three-chord boogie-woogie with plenty of barrelhouse piano and walking bass lines.

Although star-studded duet albums are often a mixed bag, when executed with appropriate collaborators and material the results can be impressive. Such is the case with many tracks on B.B. King's 80. Most of it is solid, straight-ahead big band blues, firmly within B.B.'s comfort zone and sounding appropriately comfortable – not as in boring, but warm, relaxed, and friendly, whether he's playing with old friends like Bobby Bland or with John Mayer, who acquits himself well as a guitarist, even if his voice is overwhelmed by B.B.'s towering presence. There are a couple of nice little surprises along the way, such as how Sheryl Crow reveals that she's a convincing blues singer. Nevertheless, on every tune King commands his guitar (the beloved Lucille) better than performers a fraction of his age, and his weathered voice only adds to the record's charm. On 80, King shows that he's not getting older, only better.