Port of Miami

Studio Album by released in 2006
Port of Miami's tracklist:
Intro
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Push It
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Blow (feat. Dre)
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Hustlin'
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Cross That Line (feat. Akon)
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I'm Bad
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Boss (feat. Dre)
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For Da Low (feat. Jazze Pha)
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Where My Money (I Need That)
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Get Away (feat. Mario Winans)
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Hit U From the Back (feat. Rodney)
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White House
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Pots and Pans (feat. J. Rock)
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It's My Time (feat. Lyfe Jennings)
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Street Life (feat. Lloyd)
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Hustlin' (remix) (feat. Jay-Z and Young Jeezy)
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It Ain't a Problem (feat. Carol City Cartel)
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I'm a G (feat. Lil Wayne and Brisco)
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Prayer
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Port of Miami review

Rick Ross’s witty lyrics make the album especially interesting

American rapper Rick Ross, born William Roberts in 1977, comes from Carol City, Florida. Inspired by such rap icons as Big Daddy Kane, 2Pac, Ice Cube, Notorious B.I.G. and Trick Daddy, Ross is famous in his native town for using metaphors and other devices in his lyrics and is often called lyrical genius. The debut album Port Of Miami has been released this August and its singles Hustlin’ and Push It have already received the high acclaim of the audience and the critics. The key topic of the record is drug dealing and other things connected with cocaine, probably because apart from being America’s paradise, Miami is known as one of the centers if illegal drugs operations. Rick Ross claims himself an expert in this question and devotes to it about ninety percent of his creation. As a quality debut album Port Of Miami boasts the presence of various guests stars among which there are Dre from Cool & Dre, Akon, Lil Wayne, Brisco, Jay Z and others, and the witty lyrics written by Rick Ross make it especially interesting. Though his rhymes are often called too simple, they are made like that on purpose: certain stylistic devices used by rapper, antistrophe in parrticular, are created with the help of the illusion of simplicity and easily call for bright images.

The tracks on Port Of Miami are united under the aegis of drug theme

Each track on Port Of Miami is remarkable for the beats and definite rhythm. United under the aegis of drug theme, Ross’s songs depict Miami street life, the rapper’s personal views and some elements of introspection are also present. The opening short Intro is a report about a crime connected with drugs and the first track Push It tells about achieving financial independence by means of drug dealing. This track has nice piano parts and pleases with Rick’s vocals. Dre has refined the real rap track Blow with his presence, a catchy one especially on chorus, while Hustlin’ the most conceptual song on Port Of Miami, and its remix may seem to many richer than the original due to the verses from Jay Z and Young Jeezy. Cross That Line featuring Akon is one of the most emotional tracks on which the rappers share their bitter thoughts and the music penetrating musical background adds to this despair. One of the brightest rap songs on the album is I’m Bad, here Rick Ross is a real gangsta, the powerful sounding of the track turns it into the best arrangement sample. On Get Away with Mario Winans the rapper tells about having a vacation with his girlfriend; this and some of the following tracks are closer to R&B though the topic of drugs is present on most of them as well. The final Prayer lets us know what Rick thinks of himself ending rather a tough album Port Of Miami on a philosophic introspective note.

A great opportunity to submerge into Rick Ross’s controversial world

The Southern rap school has once again presented the world with a talented artist and a charismatic guy in the face of Rick Ross. Signed to Def Jam, he has released his debut that is going to bring him the reputation of a solid hustler knowing from his own experience what it is like to survive in the streets and gain prestige. Port Of Miami is unique in many respects – sound, tunes, attitude – and is sure to provide Ross with a significant fan base. Many songs are perfect to be played at nightclubs; others suit for being listened while driving a car. Wherever Ross’s music is on, nobody is going to remain indifferent and either starts dancing or just pays attention to the clever lyrics. As a real rapper Rick is self-confident, fond of fast cars, jewelry, expensive clothes and other ways to entertain and sings about it all in his songs. Of course, Port Of Miami makes it clear what these ways are, but nobody is perfect. On the whole, this inspiring debut is promising that Rick Ross does not intend to make us wait long for the next creation. For now, since there are nineteen tracks on the record, and it is going to take time to get tired of it, we have a great opportunity to submerge into Rick Ross’s controversial world: the world full of cruelty and romance, dreadful past and luxurious present, worldly joys and deep philosophy.