Doctor's Advocate

Studio Album by released in 2006
Doctor's Advocate's tracklist:
Lookin' At You (Produced By Urban EP Pope)
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Da Shit (Produced By DJ Khalil)
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It's Okay (One Blood) (Produced By Reefa)
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Compton (Feat. Will.I.Am) (Produced By Will.I.Am)
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Remedy (Produced By Just Blaze)
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Let's Ride (Produced By Scott Storch)
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Too Much (Feat. Nate Dogg) (Produced By Scott Storch)
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Wouldn't Get Far (Feat. Kanye West) (Produced By Kanye West)
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Scream On 'Em (Feat. Swizz Beatz)
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One Night (Produced By Nottz)
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Doctor's Advocate (Feat. Busta Rhymes) (Produced By Jonathan "J.R." Rotem)
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Ol' English (Produced By Hi Tek)
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California Vacation (Feat. Snoop & Xzibit) (Produced By Jonathan ''J.R.'' Rotem)
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Bang (Feat. Kurupt & Daz) (Produced By Jelly Roll)
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Around The World (Feat. Jamie Foxx) (Produced By Mr. Porter)
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Why You Hate The Game (Feat. Nas) (Produced By Just Blaze)
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Doctor's Advocate review

Doctor’s Advocate is able to increase The Game’s popularity

One of the most notorious brawlers of the modern rap scene known as The Game has proved to all his numerous rivals in practice that he is entirely able to make his music without anyone’s patronage. Despite the pessimistic prognoses of spiteful critics his new album Doctor’s Advocate seems to be able to increase The Game’s popularity. The release of the album was accompanied with a full fledged affair worthy of a non fiction novel. It is well known that before the release of The Game’s previous album he was engaged, not without Dr. Dre’s help, in many different projects including 50 Cent’s band G-Unit. Even at those early days of his career The Game was embroiled in rap feuds associated with G-Unit. But after releasing his last year’s album The Documentary wich brought him a worldwide fame and darw him up to the rap performes elite, the scandal took a large scale shapes. Though 50 Cent, Dr. Dre and Eminem has also took pains in the album’s producing and it is obvious that it gave its share in album’s popularity, The Game proceeded stirring the feuds with G-Unit up. Finaly Dr. Dre decided to refuse from working with The Game and due to the disputes to 50 Cent The Game had to leave Aftermath Entertainment. But this couldn’t stop the rapper and has successfully sighned with Griffin Records.

The Game can’t forget about Dr. Dre

It is quite natural that the described events has influenced The Game’s new album. This concerns Dr. Dre at the first place. The Game mentions his name almost on every track here. Still it seems Game respects Dr. Dre as a West coast pioneer despite the whole G-Unit split, and he does thank Dr. Dre in the album's liner notes. It is all represented widely on the album’s first single It's Okay (One Blood) which will go down with the public as a certified classic for generations. The pulsating bass line, the echoing Junior Reid samples and subtle melody which blends the breakdowns together are all combined into an incredible track that's equal parts reggae, West coast gangsta rap and Dirty South. There's a wide variety of producers on Doctor’s Advocate including DJ Khalil, Scott Storch, Kanye West and many others, chipping in to create different beats, but even among the variance they all come with sounds that are tailor-made for Game. Another great track comes by way of Kanye, who produces and guest stars on Wouldn't Get Far. Swizz Beats helps The Game on the addictive Scream On 'Em. In Fact many of the best tracks appear in the album’s final part. These are the self titled song featuring Busta Rhymes, California Vacation where The Game is accompanied by Snoop and Xzibit and the final nine-minute song Why You Hate The Game, one of Just Blaze’s full-band extravaganzas with celestial choirs, cascading pianos, and gospel claps.

The Game shows his marketing savvy

Despite the fact that Dr. Dre had nothing to do with this project, the album sounds just as big-budget and generously appointed as The Documentary. Like his mentor, Game knows how to tweak the rattling clap of the snare and play up the percussive aspect of keyboards. He is not trying to create anything new, he finds the West Coast legacy the best thing to work with and this is his strongest point. As in his debut, Game is obsessed with the purity and history of hip-hop. Tracks here have none of the R&B-sampling or hook-girl glitz of ‘06 rap; these are big-bang beats, mildly obscure arrangements and emanating with thug energy lyrics. The Game looks like a person who knows the way to go. It seems likely in the end that the scandal connected with this album, the references throughout and head-scratching title are The Game’s show of his marketing savvy. Of course, toying with public expectations and respect of ex colleagues is the dangerous tightrope the Game walks brilliantly, and while this is nothing new, the fact remains that every track here is as good as or better than those on his debut.