Narcissus Road

Studio Album by released in 2007

Narcissus Road review

The Hours is a magnificent duet of two talented persons

The Hours is a productive collaboration of singer Antony Genn and experienced keyboardist Martin Slattery, are no strangers to the music business and the perils that abound. Antony Genn had previously played with the bands Elastica and Pulp, and worked as a producer, including producing sessions for the electronic act UNKLE. Martin Slattery is a British multi-instrumentalist band The Mescaleros. He played there amongst others electric guitar, acoustic guitar, keyboards, saxophone, and flute. The biography of The Hours could begin many places. It could begin in Sheffield, at the fag end of punk, where a ten-year old Antony Genn is standing at the stage door of The Top Rank waiting for The Clash to turn up so he can grab Joe Strummer's autograph. It could start in the early '80s, when another "Northern lad", Martin Slattery, is carving a reputation as a prodigious teenage jazz pianist and saxophonist player, performing in Manchester's Working Men's clubs alongside his dad, an organist. Let's start this tale on the road, where Genn is playing across the world with first Elastica and then Pulp and gradually losing his teeth to a crack and heroin habit. How about we start on the night of their first meeting, at Metropolis Studios in London, where Antony has taken Robbie Williams to meet Black Grape's producer Danny Sabre, but has instead met Martin Slattery and recognized a kindred spirit. However, all is well that ends well and now we can see this enchanting duet. The Hours released there debut album Narcissus Road and a lot of great people have already appreciated this “big” work at its true value.

Narcissus Road – a record for liberated people who like freedom and life

Narcissus Road is an epic pop-rock album, designed to be heard by liberated people who like freedom and their life. First single and album opener Ali In The Jungle is storming, a brooding, determined ode, which urging the listener to get up and urging them to be very attentive. Musically Narcissus Road is never subtle; it’s swelling strings and piano thrums aimed directly at Coldplay fans looking for more of an edge. However, its appeal is broadened by tracks like Love You More, which races along on an electronic beat a la Kasabian, and carries a lyric that any Oasis fan would relish. Genn is a man who thinks in cliches and the album Narcissus Road is clogged with his trite homespun. He uses them in Icarus and in the romantic composition I Miss You. The sharp guitar and sparse drumming on I Need To Know takes us back to Wire and a cornucopia of 80s guitar band influences and brightens things up for a while, but ultimately the second half of the album is nowhere near as exciting as the first. The Hours debut album Narcissus Road is good. Better than good in fact, it is totally amazing. Not too poppy, not too rocky, this is a record packed with catchy tunes and striking vocals. Complete audio perfection from the slow, subtle love song Love You More, to the English beat track People Say. It may seem too commercial and too mainstream for some, but at the same time, this is a part of its charm. It is an album that is so fine-tuned, so impeccably produced that it will appeal to absolutely everyone you know.

"Let them into your life and you won't regret!"

Antony Genn and Martin Slattery have clearly not wasted their lifetime standing behind attention-grabbing singers. As they step up to the front of the stage, organized The Hours, they bring with them a fully formed set of brilliant rock songs. Their first record Narcissus Road is never going to be anyone’s favourite album and the lack of subtlety can be a bit over-powering, but it doesn't ever try to be more then a well-produced, huge-sounding rock album. Narcissus Road may not be a faultless music, but in a genre where it's very easy to slip down the slippery of mediocrity, Antony Genn and Martin Slattery take risks. The Hours has already received support from Jarvis Cocker who said, "They understand what music is for – it's for human beings to communicate with other human beings. It's that simple, it's that important. Let them into your life. You won't regret it". Now we just can say that Narcissus Road is very interesting and specific debut release and can suppose that by the end of two or three months we can expect one of two things: The Hours will be either unavoidable or forgotten.

Narcissus Road review

The Hours is a magnificent duet of two talented persons

The Hours is a productive collaboration of singer Antony Genn and experienced keyboardist Martin Slattery, are no strangers to the music business and the perils that abound. Antony Genn had previously played with the bands Elastica and Pulp, and worked as a producer, including producing sessions for the electronic act UNKLE. Martin Slattery is a British multi-instrumentalist band The Mescaleros. He played there amongst others electric guitar, acoustic guitar, keyboards, saxophone, and flute. The biography of The Hours could begin many places. It could begin in Sheffield, at the fag end of punk, where a ten-year old Antony Genn is standing at the stage door of The Top Rank waiting for The Clash to turn up so he can grab Joe Strummer's autograph. It could start in the early '80s, when another "Northern lad", Martin Slattery, is carving a reputation as a prodigious teenage jazz pianist and saxophonist player, performing in Manchester's Working Men's clubs alongside his dad, an organist. Let's start this tale on the road, where Genn is playing across the world with first Elastica and then Pulp and gradually losing his teeth to a crack and heroin habit. How about we start on the night of their first meeting, at Metropolis Studios in London, where Antony has taken Robbie Williams to meet Black Grape's producer Danny Sabre, but has instead met Martin Slattery and recognized a kindred spirit. However, all is well that ends well and now we can see this enchanting duet. The Hours released there debut album Narcissus Road and a lot of great people have already appreciated this “big” work at its true value.

Narcissus Road – a record for liberated people who like freedom and life

Narcissus Road is an epic pop-rock album, designed to be heard by liberated people who like freedom and their life. First single and album opener Ali In The Jungle is storming, a brooding, determined ode, which urging the listener to get up and urging them to be very attentive. Musically Narcissus Road is never subtle; it’s swelling strings and piano thrums aimed directly at Coldplay fans looking for more of an edge. However, its appeal is broadened by tracks like Love You More, which races along on an electronic beat a la Kasabian, and carries a lyric that any Oasis fan would relish. Genn is a man who thinks in cliches and the album Narcissus Road is clogged with his trite homespun. He uses them in Icarus and in the romantic composition I Miss You. The sharp guitar and sparse drumming on I Need To Know takes us back to Wire and a cornucopia of 80s guitar band influences and brightens things up for a while, but ultimately the second half of the album is nowhere near as exciting as the first. The Hours debut album Narcissus Road is good. Better than good in fact, it is totally amazing. Not too poppy, not too rocky, this is a record packed with catchy tunes and striking vocals. Complete audio perfection from the slow, subtle love song Love You More, to the English beat track People Say. It may seem too commercial and too mainstream for some, but at the same time, this is a part of its charm. It is an album that is so fine-tuned, so impeccably produced that it will appeal to absolutely everyone you know.

"Let them into your life and you won't regret!"

Antony Genn and Martin Slattery have clearly not wasted their lifetime standing behind attention-grabbing singers. As they step up to the front of the stage, organized The Hours, they bring with them a fully formed set of brilliant rock songs. Their first record Narcissus Road is never going to be anyone’s favourite album and the lack of subtlety can be a bit over-powering, but it doesn't ever try to be more then a well-produced, huge-sounding rock album. Narcissus Road may not be a faultless music, but in a genre where it's very easy to slip down the slippery of mediocrity, Antony Genn and Martin Slattery take risks. The Hours has already received support from Jarvis Cocker who said, "They understand what music is for – it's for human beings to communicate with other human beings. It's that simple, it's that important. Let them into your life. You won't regret it". Now we just can say that Narcissus Road is very interesting and specific debut release and can suppose that by the end of two or three months we can expect one of two things: The Hours will be either unavoidable or forgotten.